Breaking the Ceiling

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I normally don’t do ‘finances’, but I came by this e-book by Ron Henley – Break the Law, and it seems selfish not to share. This isn’t about committing a felony or any despicable act; it’s about learning basic rules to financial freedom and independence. There is a specific “law” you must break or you will stay on your financial knees forever! We try so hard, hustle as we call it, to make so much money, yet most times we get little and before you can say jackpot, it all kinda evaporates. That said, we need to be responsible for how we earn and spend and not just cross our fingers hoping for the best. As Henley said, dividing the money of the world equally amongst the inhabitants won’t solve shingbain (English: nothing). The law to break in this context is called the Parkinson’s Law: expenses always rise to meet income. Poor people stay poor because no matter how much money they earn they spend every penny!

To break Parkinson’s Law, simply divide all of your income into four parts to meet the following targets:

  • Target 10% of your income to help the less fortunate.
  • Target 30% of your income to pay your living expenses.
  • Target 30% of your income for fun and adventure.
  • Target 30% of your income for saving and investing.

Someone might be like damn, Ron, Iyanu, what the heck, I ain’t got money for this. Just keep reading and chillax. But note that each of those targets is of utmost importance. Let’s take them briefly one-by-one.

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 Target 10% of your income to help the less fortunate: Truth is, we feel good when we help others, and it is an act of giving to humanity, and this is important for fulfillment. Note that you should never lend money to a close friend or relative, this is quite important, you can give as a gift (within the 10%), but not as a loan, if you can’t give as a gift, kindly and politely decline to avoid heartbreak and conflicts as we all have experienced at some point. Be it charity, be it tithing, observe this target without err.

 30% for living expenses: The sad truth is that most of us live beyond or parallel our income, and most times just to show we ‘belong’. Expenses should never rise above 30%, note though that if your current expenses are above that amount, focus on ways of continually driving it down to 30% or less.

30% for Savings and Investing: It is so important to do wise things with your money. Most people don’t. That’s why only 5% of the population of the richest country on the planet retire financially independent. Start with your savings first. You must also invest in your self-education and learn what you need to know about investing.

30% for Fun and Adventure: As important as saving and investing is, most people won’t do it! Here’s why. The future, for most people, doesn’t look too good! It’s all about balance. Work toward investing 30% of your income into having fun and creating some adventure in your life TODAY!

 Let’s move on then, this is getting so long, we have to fine-tune the 10-30-30-30 formula and here’s how. If it takes 90% (or whatever percentage) of your income to pay your expenses right now, use what you have left to invest in the other phases of your wealth plan. The VITAL thing is to always spend equal amounts on your savings & investing and your fun & adventure.

It may not seem like much, but if you can observe this formula conscientiously, then you will surely be financially better off. Whatever you have to do, get started today! Where you are in your current financial situation is not important. What’s important is following the plan! Most of us are just plain lazy and … lol.

 

Adapted from Ron Henley’s BREAK THE LAW

 

 

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